more different than usual

disabilityinkidlit:

clatterbane:

feliscorvus:

dendriforming:

onit-boom:

mads-next-meal:

If you are on medication for any type of mental illness, NEVER stop taking it, no matter how much you think you don’t need it. You have no idea how much that will fuck you up until it’s too late.

This is very appropriate to me today.

I’m really…

Yeahhh. I am really uncomfortable with the dichotomy that exists around psych meds. For a given drug, there are generally going to be some people who benefit from it and some for whom it may not just be unpleasant, but downright dangerous. Psychiatry in its current form is woefully inadequate to the task of addressing this situation. IMO the problem isn’t the meds but the fact that when a drug is made mainly to affect the brain, there’s a whole population of people it suddenly becomes okay to coerce into taking it. That is not okay. But the solution is not “make the drugs go away”, it’s “make the coercive nature of how they are often given go away”.

(FWIW, I currently take one type of psych med because it actually helps me. I have in the past been prescribed psych meds that did the opposite of help me.)

Very much this.

In the past, I have been on some medications that did help, and some others that did the exact opposite of helping. I’ve been on a couple that might have killed me if I had kept taking them. I’ve had heat strokes, my liver trying to shut down with the doctor ignoring lab results, and near-constant diarrhea that made it hard to leave the house much for months on end—as direct side effects of prescribed medications. I’ve had to stop taking some against medical advice, in spite of the dangerous side effects. And this is not an unusual type of situation.

Some of these were psych meds, and some were not. A medication doesn’t magically become beneficial (or even non-dangerous) for everyone it is prescribed to, just because it’s supposed to treat a certain category of conditions.

What we need is more real informed consent, and for the people who are taking medications (for whatever) to get listened to better and treated as actual partners in their own medical care. Not more scare tactics and intimidation.

No you guys, they’re not talking about going to your doctor and discussing how the medicine is working, and deciding it’s not for you. There’s a HUGE problem wherein people who have been on meds and improved will decide that since they’re doing better they won’t bother taking the meds anymore. 

The ensuing suicides and hospitalisations are many. 

Hi, just wanted to info that my doctor visit was today and they told me it's pretty surely fibromyalgia. The doctor told over and over again how exercise is the treatment and that I shouldn't let the pain stop me so easily. She also told me something about triptyl medicine but it does not go with my mental medication. I feel like I got answers but at the same time I feel like I'm not trying enough if I'm some does unable to rise from bed due pain, because of what she said.

chronicillnessmemes:

liveonmyceiling:

chronicillnessmemes:

OK, I want to again point out that I am not a medical professional.  But I think you need to go to a different doctor.  There is a difference between pain and fatigue.  It doesn’t sound like your doctor is differentiating.  Most people can work through pain.  But not having the energy to get out of bed is not the same as being curled up in pain and refusing to move.  Do you see the difference?

Also, (again non-medical professional) exercise does help some people with Fibromyalgia.  It helps those who are not suffering from extreme symptoms.  And that is light exercise.  My biggest concern with what you are telling me is that your doctor sent you out the door WITHOUT a treatment plan.  Just telling you to exercise is not a treatment.  If they are going to prescribe exercise for Fibromyalgia, they should have either referred you to a physical therapist or given you a specific exercise regimen that includes limitations.

Telling someone with Fibromyalgia who is specifically experiencing fatigue that they should just exercise and everything will be OK, is a red flag that they do not actually take this diagnosis seriously.  GO TO ANOTHER DOCTOR.  If for some reason you are unable to do this, go back to this doctor and demand treatment.  Demand specifics.  That is their job.  It is not your job to figure this out. Unfortunately that is how it works sometimes, but you have a right to actual treatments not an off hand dismissal.

I am so sorry you are going through this.  I know what it is like to struggle with fatigue and having to make another appointment is probably the last thing you want to do.  But a doctor telling you that you should be able to get out of bed, doesn’t magically make you able to do this.  Their job is to get you to the point where you can.  And even if this wasn’t fatigue, even if this was only pain, they should be treating the pain to get you to a point where you are able to work through it.

Here is the deal.  If you say you are in too much pain or too much fatigue to function, that is the line in the sand.  The doctor doesn’t get to say, no you wrong about HOW YOU FEEL. Because if they don’t take how you feel seriously, they are not going to treat you seriously.

I wish I were there.  I wish I could go sit in that office with you and shake that doctor by the shoulders and say THAT IS A BULLSHIT ANSWER!  DO YOUR JOB OR REFER THEM TO SOMEONE THAT WILL!  Don’t give up and do not blame yourself.  If you are in too much pain to function, that is not your fault.  It is not a defect of character, it is that the pain is overwhelming.  Period.

But I still think you are talking about fatigue and not pain.  I think the doctor was able to derail the conversation to try and simplify it.  This is not a simple diagnosis.  This is a diagnosis that science has yet to understand.  Keep that in mind.  If a doctor tells you they understand something that the medical community at large does not.  RUN AWAY.

I am sending you lots of love and all the spoons.  Thanks for keeping us posted, I hope you continue to do so.

Same sentiments as above. 

Too many time throughout my life -even before I got sick- I’ve had to deal with doctors who very obviously didn’t listen to a word I said and just sent me off with words about how a healthy diet and plenty of exercise would make me feel better. Even when I was there for a check up or the flu. I know how hard it is not to internalize everything, but I want you to know: just because they say it doesn’t automatically make them correct. Additionally, just because you think something doesn’t make it true either (your feelings, however, are always valid). Maybe a strange thing to say, but fatigue is part of my illnesses and I am so hard on myself about what I “should” be able to do, and that is reinforced from a lot of directions. But what we “should” be doing is taking care of ourselves, whatever that means from moment to moment. 

Sorry for the unsolicited advice, hope it helps. Wishing you the best.

But what we “should” be doing is taking care of ourselves, whatever that means from moment to moment.

But what we “should” be doing is taking care of ourselves, whatever that means from moment to moment.

But what we “should” be doing is taking care of ourselves, whatever that means from moment to moment.

This is so important!

youneedacat:

"For elementary school children on the higher functioning end of the autism spectrum, I usually favor mainstreaming because it is essential for them to learn social skills from typically developing children."

—Temple Grandin, The Way I See It

[If this is too long for you,…

smallsthehero:

anzuai:

eddplant:

quazza:

lavastormsw:

lordsquiggleshire:

pixelnoton:

#tw: dynamite gal

Oh wait now I get what triggers are

Yeah, see, THIS is a trigger. Something that prompts a horrible flashback that makes someone go into a literal panic attack. It is NOT something that makes you slightly uncomfortable, so can we all just stop tossing that word around like it’s nothing.

thank you Wreck It Ralph

Reblogging for valuable commentary

Also, can we talk about how Felix dealt with it? He NEVER used that word again (only once in front of Ralph, never by her), there was never any talk about how she could get over it, and in their wedding they all made plans to help her with her paranoia by recognising her fears and showing she was safe by pointing guns at the window and having extra security.

A++++++ on dealing with mental issues magnificently, Wreck-It Ralph!

Will never not reblog this when I see it

lolabugge:

THIS JUST IN: only thin people are allowed to have chronic pain or chronic illnesses. Fat people with disabilities will be magically cured by weight loss. More at 11.

fatkidinmath:

is drake bell related to taco bell (??)

In the United States, access to tampons and pads for low-income women is a real problem, too: food stamps don’t cover feminine hygiene products, so some women resort to selling their food stamps in order to pay for “luxuries” like tampons. Women in prison often don’t have access to sanitary products at all, and the high cost of a product that half the population needs multiple times a day, every month for approximately 30 years, is simply, well, bullshit.

- The case for free tampons (via stuffmomnevertoldyou)

You know, I don’t think I’ve ever heard anybody suggest that toilet paper or paper towels in public bathrooms shouldn’t be free.  We’d consider it outrageous if that very basic necessity were to be missing, or provided only for purchase.

And yet.

(via animatedamerican)

For that matter, NO school that I went to before college had working machines in the bathrooms that ever got stocked. It was a problem for a lot of people, on a regular basis. Someone had vending machines installed at some point—and probably someone else made the decision later on that they did not need to be maintained or refilled ever.

They weren’t so great with the (free) paper products either, but those did occasionally get refilled. Not even reliably enough to be able to depend on using the awful brown institutional paper towels in an emergency, though I think most of us did resort to that at one time or another.

Only one of those schools had a nurse on premises—who was having to pay out of pocket for emergency menstrual supplies for students, since funding for that got cut off as “nonessential”. (I overheard her complaining one day, talking with several equally appalled teachers.) She did not consider that “nonessential”, and was thankfully willing to buy them. Never should have had to. That’s beyond the ridiculous markup.

I’m not that surprised that a lot of prisoners don’t have access. Hadn’t thought of it before, but “nonessential”. :-|

(via clatterbane)

I’ve never been homeless, but I’m going to guess here that homeless women probably have an ongoing problem with this kind of issue, also.  Do homeless shelters or other programs giving food and other necessities to homeless women think to include tampons or pads?

And speaking as someone who has had some very heavy menstruation (to the point where I can remember putting in an ultra AND a super tampon SIMULTANEOUSLY in order to get through to the end of a two-hour lecture without too much spill over) I would imagine all of these problems are compounded for women who, due to fibroids or other issues, have extremely heavy menstruation, because often even other women don’t always understand how heavy menstruation can get for some women.  And fibroids are fairly common—I forget exact figures but I think something like 20 to 40 percent of women have them at some point.  So even a “standard” or “typical” supply of tampons or pads, assembled with the “average” menstruating woman in mind, may really really not be at ALL adequate for a woman who menstruates more heavily than most women.

(via andreashettle)

I’d like to point out that there are more economic replacements for tampons. You can get menstrual cups for like $30 in the US that last like 3-5 years. Or cotton washable pads. There’s this group that sells underwear you can wear on your period so you don’t even need a liner, and for every pair you buy they give a third world girl a set of washable cotton pads so they don’t have to take a week off school every month.

I wanted to meet the other autistic people I’d been told about and was surprised to find out that they were few and far between, scattered across the country and across the world. I was in an even smaller category. I had become “high functioning.” Nevertheless, I needed to meet others. I could only know where I belonged in relation to others when I had met the other side of society. I’d met a world of so-called “normal” people — the people I’d aspired to be like. Now it was time to meet people still trapped in the place I had come from and in some ways still was in.

Kath was a solid personality with whom I felt relatively secure. Her voice was rather flat and even, and the pace with which she spoke was easy to follow. She had long straight gray hair and darting eyes, and though I felt welcomed by her I didn’t feel smothered by her involvement.

She had a son my age, and her son was autistic. When I met him, he was running his hands through colored beads. I didn’t want him to say hello or ask me how I was. Those were words reserved for those who wanted to move in “the world,” and her son Perry certainly didn’t.

I sat on the floor nearby and took out a handful of colored buttons and glass fruit. I sorted them into groups, put my hand out to where Perry was playing with his beads, and without a glance and without a word, I dropped them. Perry caught them and did the same back. I remembered my first version of relating — mirrors — but this time there would be no one to say that my version of relating wasn’t good enough. This went on for awhile and we began to modify the game. I had a bell that I jingled to myself and dropped it for him to catch. Like before, Perry repeated my gesture but added another noise to the jingle. I mirrored him. we began following one another about the place in turn, ringing the bell and giving it over as the game became more and more one between two people than one where we were merely incidental to the game we made the objects play.

I sat back on the floor, lining up the buttons in categories. Perry approached, picked up a button here and there and added them to my rows where they belonged. Without looking at him, I knew what he was saying. These “games” had always belonged to me. Now I saw that these “games” belonged to autistic people.

I hadn’t noticed that Kath had entered the room. She was standing there silently as Perry came over to where I was, laid himself out, face down, on the floor in front of me, arms pulled up tightly against his sides as he shook with anxiety.

“Look at me,” I said, reading the same action I’d seen so many times in myself. “Look. I’m daring to be touched.” I had looked straight at Perry lying there as I had said it, tears rolling down my face as I read his behavior as one might a book. I had the tremors from head to toes and wished the Welshman was there to understand himself as I had come to understand myself.

I turned to see Kath crying.

“I never thought he had any language,” she said. “Now I see he does, I just don’t know how to speak it.” She said that she had never seen him look so “normal.” I had never felt I’d understood another individual so well. “We think it is we who have to teach autistic people,” Kath said. “Now I see it is us who have so much to learn from them.”

Donna Williams, Nobody Nowhere, p. 193-194

This is part of my collection of quotes about what happens when autistic people get together and speak our own languages with each other.  I have a binder somewhere with lots more of these quotes.  I wish I knew where they all were, because this is something very important.  Things like this happen all the time when autistic people — who click well with each other — meet for the first time and magic happens.

Also I played all these games when I was a kid too, and didn’t know they were an autistic thing.

(via youneedacat)

gdfalksen:

Download over 250 art books for free here
http://www.getty.edu/publications/virtuallibrary/index.html
newmiu:

drwholvr:

101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.
their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever



pilots (◡‿◡✿) 
girl pilots (◕‿◕✿)
girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕ヮ◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

I’m reblogging this again. Always reblogging. Always

BADASS

newmiu:

drwholvr:

101st-analborne:

fallbeil:

mugenstyle:

eccecorinna:

wrathofprawn:

for those not in the know, night witches were russian lady bombers who bombed the shit out of german lines in WW2. Thing is though, they had the oldest, noisiest, crappest planes in the entire world. The engines used to conk out halfway through their missions, so they had to climb out on the wings mid flight to restart the props. the planes were also so noisy that to stop germans from hearing them combing and starting up their anti aircraft guns, they’d climb up to a certain height, coast down to german positions, drop their bombs, restart their engines in midair, and get the fuck out of dodge.

their leader flew over 200 missions and was never captured.

how the fuck is this not taught in every single history class ever

pilots (◡‿◡✿) 

girl pilots (◕◕✿)

girl pilots killing nazis ✧・゚: *✧・゚:* \(◕◕✿)/ *:・゚✧*:・゚✧

But, remember, women never did anything in history.

I’m reblogging this again. Always reblogging. Always

BADASS